• When Should You Replace Your Audi’s Oxygen Sensor in Mountain View?

    Audi Oxygen Sensor

    When driving an Audi, you likely have specific expectations for how the car should operate. Because you’ve spent money to purchase a luxury vehicle, you will anticipate that it has fewer problems to deal with. In some cases this is true. However, in most cars, you may experience some problems every now and again.

    If caught early enough, you can avoid having to spend money on costly repairs. You can catch many issues early on by simply taking your vehicle in for regular inspections. Through regular maintenance, your mechanic will be able to notice if something does not look right and can recommend the best fix for the issue.

    What is an oxygen sensor and what does it do?

    In your Audi, you will have a component called the oxygen sensor. The oxygen sensor is also referred to as the O2 sensor, and it is an important component in your vehicle. The oxygen sensor monitors the oxygen levels in the exhaust system and helps to determine what the right fuel mixture should be. If your Audi is burning lean, this means that there is too much oxygen. If it is burning rich, then your Audi is not burning enough oxygen. If your car does not have the right fuel mixture, this will impact the overall performance.

    Depending on your car, you may have an oxygen sensor on each cylinder, but it is typical for the oxygen sensor to be located under the hood of your vehicle or beneath the car. The location of the oxygen sensor is completely dependent on the type of car you have and the manufacturer’s preference. The oxygen sensors are attached behind or in front of your car’s catalytic converter or will be located on the car’s exhaust pipe.

    The sensor works alongside your Audi’s computer, meaning that the sensor will notify the computer what the fuel mixture is and then determine if it is burning too rich or too lean. It then compensates and adjusts to create the right mixture for your car. The oxygen sensor even plays a role in your car’s emission output and can determine what mixture creates the lowest emissions.

    When dealing with a problematic oxygen sensor, it could mean that your emission output will increase or that your sensor will not work with the computer properly to find the right mixture. This means that your car’s overall performance may suffer and your fuel efficiency may lower. With an issue like this, it is recommended to get it dealt with immediately. Otherwise, you are burning through money as fast as your car is burning through fuel.

    How Can an Oxygen Sensor Fail?

    A leak is the most common reason that your oxygen sensor can fail. It will either be a coolant leak or an oil leak, but it will typically be an oil leak. You will need to get the leak looked at to determine the cause and to make sure that you are not dealing with a more serious issue. Otherwise, all you will need to do will be to get the sensor replaced or repaired. Have a trusted mechanic inspect the oxygen sensor. Once they have found the cause of the leak, they will be able to replace the part for you and it should not be too complicated of a procedure.

    Audi Oxygen Sensor Malfunction

    How We Can Help

    Here at German Motor Specialists, our skilled technicians can take a look at your Audi’s oxygen sensor and determine what will need to be done in order to have a proper repair. Our shops are convenient to the residents of Atherton, Cupertino, Los Altos Hills, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Redwood City, Santa Clara, Stanford, and Sunnyvale, CA. We aim to provide you will the best customer service and take pride in providing our clients with many different services as a reliable business with an established customer base.

    It is important to us that you feel safe driving in your vehicle and we will do everything we can to properly maintain and repair your car. If you would like to learn more about the services that we offer, or would like to schedule an appointment, please visit our website or call our office.

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